Servant Leadership Review & Survey

July 11, 2018

 

 

 

 

I was about 15 years old when I learned about servant leadership. I played basketball in high school and we had a pretty good team. We were doing a drill and someone messed up, which resulted in the team starting over and doing it until we got it right. And I complained, like a normal whining teenager ready to just move on to the next drill. My coach walked over and told me specifically, "Until you come and give 110% consistently, don't ever complain about anyone else." It hit me right then. As a team, we are in it together. It is our responsibility to help guide each other to get the drill right, and as a leader, who was I to complain and not have empathy for a friend? I took that attitude and applied it to my life. That day, I became a better leader, a better friend, and an all around better person, putting people first and serving others while setting my selfish wants aside. 

 

As a working adult, it's hard to imagine any successful company without servant leaders. Servant leaders are the leaders that sacrifice their own feelings, ideas, and time for the greater good. They lead by example and take on a conscious desire to serve first, which is admirable. Servant leaders have a  natural desire to serve others while being devoted to their growth and well-being. It's about relationships. When we learn the value of relationships, it becomes easier to appreciate and enhance it. Servant leaders don't lead from a position of power using authority and force, but from a place of humility and sincere passion for others, being engaged with their needs, giving of themselves and their time without expectation of a return. The video below is Mo Cheeks, NBA coach who displayed this type of leadership during the singing of the national anthem, when Natalie Gilbert makes a mistake on the national anthem. Selflessly, he supports her, stands with her, gives her comfort, and helps sings with her. 

 

The qualities of a servant leader are active listening, empathy, healing, awareness, persuasion, conceptualization, foresight, stewardship, commitment to the growth of people, and building community. Some of the most famous servant leaders that exhibited these qualities are Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Nelson Mandela, Mother Teresa, and Jesus. Just think of these qualities that a servant leader displays and honestly evaluate which you should focus on improving to make those around you better. 

 

 

 

Active Listening is more than just hearing someone. It involves you being active in the conversation physically, emotionally, and mindfully by hearing, understanding, and responding to the communicator. Empathy is putting yourself in someone else's shoes and understanding where they are. The video on the right is a short video that explains the difference between empathy and sympathy.  It gives a great view on what we think we do versus what it actually is. Healing is a great characteristic of a servant leader because it shows a restorative belief in others. Awareness helps you to see and attend to the needs of others, while also being aware of how you can be perceived. Persuasion is key in changing attitudes from authority to teammate. It creates a relationship that removes demand. 

 

Conceptualization helps servant leaders to think beyond today, focusing on long term goals. Foresight is very close to conceptualization in that the mind set of the leader is thinking of the future. It differs in that foresight uses lessons from the past and present to help shape the direction of the future. Stewardship is a characteristic that really transforms the 'pay it forward' ideal. It is responsibility and management entrusted to an individual that they do not own, a great example of this is power. Committing to the growth of others helps develop team members in more ways than just at work. Building community is something that many people forget when it comes to servant leadership. Caring about the well-being of others expands to everyone, not just your employees or direct reports. 

 

 

The corporate world needs more servant leaders.We as managers should embrace a new and better approach of understanding and tending to the needs of others. Our success in our careers can be transformed by taking steps to better our relationships with others. As managers it is easy to rise to power, but think of the benefit of nurturing each relationship and learning how to communicate. We have prepared a ten question quiz below to help you see where you are as a servant leader. For each answer, write the number that applies. Check the key at the bottom to see where you are. 

 

 Active listening is important in my leadership style.

1 - Not at all important 

2 - Not so important 

3 - Somewhat Important

4 - Very Important 

5 - Extremely Important 

 

Empathy helps me to communicate my ideas in a way that makes sense to others, and it helps me understand others when they communicate.

1 - Strongly Disagree 

2 - Disagree 

3 - Neither agree or disagree 

4 - Agree

5 - Strongly Agree

 

I am committed to helping my team grow in their position, career, and life.

 

1 - Strongly Disagree 

2 - Disagree 

3 - Neither agree or disagree 

4 - Agree

5 - Strongly Agree

 

I would rate my self awareness as

1 - Not at all Aware

2 - Not So Aware 

3 - Somewhat Aware 

4 - Very Aware

5 - Extremely Aware 

 

 

I am aware of others and their feelings.

 

1 - Not at all Aware

2 - Not So Aware 

3 - Somewhat Aware 

4 - Very Aware

5 - Extremely Aware 

 

I believe in restoration in others.

1 - Strongly Disagree 

2 - Disagree 

3 - Neither agree or disagree 

4 - Agree

5 - Strongly Agree

 

I  believe in serving the needs of others.

1 - Strongly Disagree 

2 - Disagree 

3 - Neither agree or disagree 

4 - Agree

5 - Strongly Agree

 

I use persuasion to convince others rather than authority to coerce.

1 - Strongly Disagree 

2 - Disagree 

3 - Neither agree or disagree 

4 - Agree

5 - Strongly Agree

 

I use systemic thinking to approach day-to-day operations.

1 - Strongly Disagree 

2 - Disagree 

3 - Neither agree or disagree 

4 - Agree

5 - Strongly Agree

 

I normally use experiences from the past and present to shape future actions and outcomes.

1 - Strongly Disagree 

2 - Disagree 

3 - Neither agree or disagree 

4 - Agree

5 - Strongly Agree

 

Scoring Key

 

40 - 50  - You really embody and exemplify servant leadership. I would like to encourage you to continue striving for the well-being of others and making a difference in the world. Your leadership has more than likely changed the way that people think of managers and how they display their position of power. Having this level of humanity in life motivates people all around you. Keep up the good work!
 

30 - 39 - You are a great work in progress! It takes discipline and practice to incorporate this type of thinking in the workplace. Please stay encouraged, someone you have worked with has experienced your level of compassion, and at this level, you are being the example of paying it forward. 

 

5 - 29 - Being a servant leader isn't for everyone, but if you feel like it is for you, be encouraged to continue working on it. The selfless behaviors of a servant leader are what sets them apart and the commitment to the well being of others. We can't teach you to be selfless, however you can create and change habits that affect how you interact with others, which can help you develop as a leader. Embodying any of the qualities of a servant leader means you have what it takes to positively impact the lives of others. And that is what really matters. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Results

 

 

Please reload

Our Recent Posts

Creating the Work-Life Balance

May 7, 2019

Steps to Calm Your Interview Anxiety

March 27, 2019

Psychological Warfare in the Workplace

October 1, 2018

1/1
Please reload

Tags